Random memory of a life drifting between #11 and #12.
Recent Tweets @justanothersky

archiemcphee:

For a series of awesome sculptures entitled Why not hand over a shelter to hermit crabs?, Japanese artist Aki Inomata creates plastic habitats for hermit crabs inspired by styles of architecture ranging from major cityscapes (like New York’s skyline) to Parisian apartments or Tokyo-style homes.

Aki Inomata creates these delicate and beautiful new habitats by first conducting CT scans of her hermit crabs’ discarded shells. Capturing a detailed 3D rendering of their abandoned homes enables her to prototype and produce new habitable shelters that her hermit crabs will find similar to their usual homes.

"The semi-transparent, delicate forms are designed in the style of physical human environments, which ironically become a shelter for the aquatic arthropods. The biology of the hermit crab makes it a fascinating example of identity transfer — as they grow they require larger shells and periodically interchange their external portion with other members of the crustacean community. Inomata connects her study of the hermit’s transformation to the self-adaptation of humans, whether it be in acquiring a new nationality, immigrating or relocating."

[via Designboom]

bobbycaputo:

Photographer Uses Light and Shadows to Frame Human Forms in the City

Want to see some beautiful street photographs that make use of light and shadows? Look no further than the project “Man on Earth” by London-based photographer Rupert Vandervell. Each image in the series shows a single person’s figure framed by the shadows and features of a big city.

Some of the people are walking through narrow channels of light caused by giant skyscrapers, while others are sitting in a glowing circle of light found in bus stops at night.

Vandervell says that his goal with the series was to focus on the subjects rather than the city. The pictures are “less about the environment they are taken
in and more about the ‘human factor’ moving through it,” he writes.

The photographs do not reveal much about the locations in which they were shot, as most of the features of the area are obscured by darkness. This is intentional — each location is simply meant to represent “the ever-changing backdrop of the modern city,” and the viewer can focus on the “unique visual characteristics of the human form.”

(Continue Reading)

Humorous and Political Street Art by Escif
Christopher Jobson, thisiscolossal.com

On-Off (Katowice, Poland)
On-Off (Katowice, Poland)
Wikileaks (Valencia, Spain)
Ne travaillez jamais (Besancon, France)
Gentrification (Valencia, Spain)
HELP (Praghe / Czech Republic)
El rescate del euro (Niort, France)
The…

kylefewell:

Was asked to be apart of BLDGWLF’s monthly illustration series ”when I was a kid I used to…”. My entry is about how I used to play a lot of video games (a lot on my Game Boy Pocket) and ate far too many hotdogs when I was a little kid. Way too many hot dogs.

popculturebrain:

‘Breaking Bad’ coloring book | BuzzFeed

More through the link.

Modern Abstract City Maps
Christopher Jobson, thisiscolossal.com

I’m really enjoying these abstract city maps by Jazzberry Blue (warning: audio). The cities you see above as well as Jerusalem and New Delhi are available as Giclée prints over on Etsy. (via unknown editors)

brooklynmutt:

“Everyone should see this beautiful tribute from Rachel Maddow to Michael Hastings.” - @BuzzFeedAndrew

tiffanyandco:


Tiffany salutes the Roaring Twenties with a Blue Book bangle that evokes the era’s Art Deco patterns and foxtrot-filled nights.

tiffanyandco:

Tiffany salutes the Roaring Twenties with a Blue Book bangle that evokes the era’s Art Deco patterns and foxtrot-filled nights.

tiffanyandco:

Blue and violet gemstones turn the twilight hour into a celebration of chic.  

tiffanyandco:

Blue and violet gemstones turn the twilight hour into a celebration of chic.  

arpeggia:

David Stephenson - Domes, 1993-2005

Click on each image for location details.

See more David Stephenson posts here.

arpeggia:

Anish Kapoor - Leviathan, 2011 | More posts

Stanley Kubrick on the set of 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

(via oldfilmsflicker)